Entertainment

Prep News Movie Reviews

This piece was published in the August 2016 print edition of the Prep News and was co-written by Josh O’Dell and Jack Agnello.

Suicide Squad 

We didn’t realize how nonsensical the plot of this movie was until about ten minutes in, but by then we had already paid full admission for this god-forsaken movie. The only conceivable reason for a sequel would be so that Harley Quinn (Margot Rosuicidesquadbbie) could take revenge for the blatant, widespread misogyny that she was forced to endure. She was clearly only present in the movie to serve as an example of the Joker’s (Jared Leto) depravity and as sex appeal in this male-dominated movie.

In fact, it seemed that all of the characters had a specific role to play in this haphazard excuse for a plot. We quickly found that none of our “heroes” were powerful enough to oppose the forces set against them, so a happy ending could only be ensured through some twisted deus ex-machina. There were long stretches of unnecessary dead time which were filled by music that didn’t suit the given situation.

The writing in this movie was atrocious, featuring a massive surplus of throwaway lines as the characters on screen narrate what the audience can clearly see for itself.

All of this only serves to illustrate DC’s hurried effort to set the stage for Justice League in order to combat Marvel’s runaway success in the same genre.

Lights Out

The summer horror film, Lights Out, played off of pop outs and an abnormal plot line. The plot line was the only thing this film had going for it.

The pop out scenes eventually became predictable, and the thrill was taken out of it. At the Prep News, we recognize that acting in the horror genre is not always up to par, but Lights Out surprised us. Specifically, Teresa Palmer, Alexander DiPersia and Maria Bello.

The storyline of Lights Out was a good one, but left no room for a sequel.

Captain Fantastic

This movie centers around a devoted father who lives deep in the forests of the Pacific Northwest dedicating his life to transforming his six children into extraordinary adults. However, when tragedy strikes, everything the father has taught his children is called into question.

This movie made us all want to be better fathers… if we had children, that is. Inspirational from beginning to end, this movie features all the hallmarks of a fantastic movie: family values, insurmountable challenges, and a desire to “set the world on fire.”

The soundtrack was perfectly suited to the flow of this movie.

Deeply emotional at times, we found ourselves on the verge of tears on multiple occasions.

This was a well-produced film from open to close, and left us feeling well-satisfied, though certainly not with our own intelligence.

Jason Bourne

This was a Jason Bourne movie, plain and simple. Matt Damon delivers on his previous role as the American secret agent, even showing us that you really can teach an old dog new tricks.

Matt Damon shows a different side of the secret agent, remaining stoicly silent for the majority of the movie.

If you liked the previous Bourne movies, this most recent addition will not disappoint.

Finding Dory

When the film Finding Dory was announced, it had some big shoes to fill. The movie’s predecessor, Finding Nemo, was up there with Cars on Pixar’s best movies. While the movie’s plot line was quite similar to Finding Nemo, we at the Prep News thought that the film was well done. Directors Andrew Stanton and Angus Maclane were able to breathe some fresh air into an early 2000’s classic. The release of the film already has fans wondering what’s next for the popular film company.

 

 

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